Shamisen Dixieland for trial 「三味線デキシーランドの試み」

In Osaka, where I grew up, and its neighboring city Kobe, there is a deep-rooted popularity of Dixieland jazz, commonly known in the Kansai region.

Could it be because this lively music suits the vibrant Kansai people’s temperament?

I tried to “experiment” with playing Dixieland jazz using traditional Japanese instruments.

I replaced the clarinet with the shakuhachi, the banjo with the shamisen, and the piano with the koto.”

”Shamisen Dixieland”
composed & arranged by SunnyG
May 22, 2016

私が育った大阪、そのお隣の神戸、所謂関西ではデキシ―ランドジャズに根強い
人気があります。乗りのいい関西人の気質に合うからなのでしょうか。

デキシ―ランドジャズを和楽器で演奏するとどうなるのか、
「こ・こ・ろ・み」ました。

クラリネットのパートを尺八に、バンジョーを三味線に、
ピアノを琴に置き換えてみたのです。

「三味線デキシーランドの試み」
作・編曲;SunnyG(サニー爺)
2016年5月22日


Shamisen
The shamisen is a traditional Japanese string instrument. It looks a bit like a banjo with a long neck and a rectangular body covered with animal skin.
It has three strings that are plucked with a large pick called a “bachi.” The shamisen produces a distinct and vibrant sound and is often used in Japanese folk music, theater, and puppet plays.


Shakuhachi
The shakuhachi is a traditional Japanese bamboo flute. It is usually about 55 cm (22 inches) long and has five finger holes – four on the front and one on the back. The shakuhachi produces a rich, mellow tone and is known for its versatility in playing both traditional and contemporary music. It is often used in meditation and Zen Buddhist ceremonies.


Koto
The koto is a traditional Japanese string instrument that resembles a long, wooden zither. It has 13 strings, each stretched over movable bridges that can be adjusted to change the pitch. Players use picks worn on their fingers to pluck the strings, producing a delicate and resonant sound. The koto is often used in both solo performances and ensemble pieces in Japanese classical music


 

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